Skye coastal walking – Suishnish

The Suardal, Kilbride, Boreraig and Suishnish area of south Skye offers a wealth of walking possibilities.  This Skye coastal walking guide to Suishnish covers the coast, geology and wildlife of what is a tranquil and often deserted area that offers all kinds of possibilities.

Take the Kilbride township road from the Broadford to Elgol road and follow it until it reaches the sea at the beach of Camas Malag where there is space for parking.  Camas Malag is a good site for otters but you’ll need to sit quietly and be patient as these animals are very prone to disturbance.

Start the walk at Camas Malag

Start the walk at Camas Malag

The track can be walked, mainly above the shoreline, all the way to Suishnish where there is an active hill steading.  Interesting diversions on the way are, to the left, to explore the limestone outcrops that, in spring, are full of wild flowers, including mountain avens.  The ground is dotted with sink holes made by water erosion and some of these are big enough for pot holing, so take care.  There is also the remains of a neo-lithic broch off the track to the left before you get to Suishnish.

Limestone outcrops

Limestone outcrops

Nearer to Suishnish, before the steading, you can cut down across the parks to the shore where Stac Suishnish, a big block of very climbable rock on the shore, is to be found with the cave of Calman nearby. The shore is rough going across big boulders and not recommended for any length of time.

The path above Suishnish follows the coast all the way round to Boreraig, which has the remains of ruined houses dating from the time of the Highland Clearances.  There is a route over the hill to Kilchrist church on the Broadford to Elgol road from where you can walk back to where you parked.  Alternatively you can retrace your steps along the coast back to Camas Malag.

There’s a good chance of seeing deer in this area and the low hills make good vantage points for seeing Golden Plovers and, if you are very lucky, Golden Eagles, which cruise the higher moorlands looking for Red Grouse and whatever else they can find to feed on.

Red deer hinds on the hill

Red deer hinds on the hill

You definitely need a good map to explore this area.  Happily, guests staying at Springbank Elgol, our Skye self catering holiday cottage have access to a comprehensive selection of good quality maps, guide books and field guides that are provided as part of our environmental activities offer.

If you like to get away from it this walk is ideal as only a handful of people trouble to explore this largely empty area.  The rewards in terms of wildlife sightings and peaceful enjoyment of a wild landscape make it well worthwhile.